The Demons Of Adad Untash: Muzgub Anang Gul

Far beyond the great desert, one will find the troubled land of Umaab. The people of this once proud kingdom are oft beset by demons who serve the dark god Nergal. The characteristics of these demons are described in the holy Tablets of Adad Untash.

Dusz raced down the hill, his grandfather’s battle axe in hand, to meet the wave of rat-demons that tore through the crops of his father’s farm. As he drew closer he could see their snapping jaws, so reminiscent of the great crocodiles that line the far banks of the river Zal near the ruined ziggurat.

The creatures moved with blinding speed and were fast upon the boy, hungry for more than the simple grains that scarcely sated the perpetual burning in their bellies. Their teeth, set in mouths raw and bleeding from an incessant quest to feed, sank into his calves and thighs even as they deftly avoided the blade of his axe.

Suddenly, one of the monsters fell away in a blur of yelping pain, dying as its skin blistered from contact with the Blessed Water of Ea. Giszeah, the hermit’s daughter, had appeared from the west, hurling small vials of the holy water at the beasts, who now began to flee as quickly as they had engaged in battle.

Muzgub Anang Gul (Lower Order Demon)
No. Enc.: 2d4 (2d4)
Alignment: Chaotic (evil)
Movement: 180’ (60’)
Armor Class: 4
Hit Dice: 1
Attacks: 1 (bite)
Damage: 1d4+1
Save: F1
Morale: 7
Hoard Class: None
XP: 31

Muzgub Anang Gul are wretched little demons with the bodies of large rats. Their bizarre countenances resemble crocodile heads. These creatures are very fast, and automatically win initiative on the first round of combat. In subsequent rounds they receive a +1 to their initiative rolls.

Additionally, they possess all of the abilities of a typical Lower Order Demon:

  • Infravision (90’)
  • Half damage from cold-based attacks
  • Half damage from electrical-based attacks
  • Half damage from fire-based attacks (all)
  • Half damage from gas-type attacks
  • Telepathy (allows all languages to be understood)

Further, these creatures are:

  • Susceptible to damage from “cold iron” weapons – hits from such weapons do an additional 1d4 damage.
  • Highly vulnerable to Holy Water, taking 1d8 damage per thrown vial that hits or an additional 1d4 damage from weapons doused in such a fluid.
  • Able to be turned (as creatures of 3HD) by Clerics of the gods of Umaab.

Muzgub Anang Gul often plague fields that have not been blessed by the harvest god Tammuz, devouring everything in their path.

The Tablets of Adad Untash tell the faithful that Muzgub Anang Gul are the souls of unwise farmers who allowed their crops to wither, bringing hunger to their families.

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This entry was posted in Demons Of Adad Untash, Labyrinth Lord, Monsters, Umaab. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to The Demons Of Adad Untash: Muzgub Anang Gul

  1. bat says:

    Hey! Where did this blog come from?
    Absolutely amazing blog! WOW!
    Keep up the excellent work!

  2. Hey thanks, bat! That really does mean a lot coming from you, amigo.

    I’d been kicking the idea of starting up one of these here blog things for a while and finally decided to take the plunge. Glad you like what you see. There should be plenty more to come.

  3. bat says:

    I seriously like everything! LL and BoL. It is like rpg heaven. I will be checking this out constantly.

    No pressure, old chap.

  4. Oh yeah, no pressure at all 🙂

    Glad you’re digging what I’m dishing. I’ve got, at the bare minimum, a bunch more of these demons to put out there. And there’s a small chunk of BoL stuff to post as well. I’ll just keep my fingers crossed that the well doesn’t run dry after those.

  5. Pingback: The Demons Of Adad Untash: Lower Order Demon Summary « Strange Stones

  6. Pingback: The Demons Of Adad Untash: Badag Gul | Strange Stones

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